HALE VETERINARY CLINIC
DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY FOR PETS

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A VISIT TO THE TOOTH VET
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Here's a description of the typical process encountered by pet owners when they are referred to  Hale Veterinary Clinic.

1. Your vet calls Dr. Hale
Your veterinarian has detected an oral or dental concern with your pet and feels a referral to a veterinary dental specialist is called for. Your veterinarian will be calling Hale Veterinary Clinic shortly to explain the situation and introduce you and your pet. Then Dr. Hale will be expecting a call from you.

2. Preliminary questions
When you call, Dr. Hale or one of the registered veterinary technicians (RVTs) will answer as many of your questions as possible, but in general terms. Until we have actually seen your pet we cannot make an accurate diagnosis or make specific recommendations.

3. An appointment
After you have discussed your pet’s problem(s), and if you are ready to proceed, you  will arrange an appointment time to bring your pet to the clinic in Guelph. Dr. Hale's staff will schedule enough time to allow for evaluation and treatment of the problem in one visit (some procedures, such as metal crowns and management of facial fractures, will require two visits).

4. Day of appointment – no food
Your pet should have no food for 12 hours prior to the appointment but can have water until you leave home. On your arrival, you will be asked to fill out a brief information sheet and read Who Does What. You can also hand over any documents sent with you by your veterinarian. After Dr. Hale has reviewed this information, the oral examination and client interview will begin.

5. Things to bring
For your comfort, please bring some slippers or "indoor" shoes, as you will be asked to leave outdoor footwear in the vestibule (for winter appointments mostly). For your pet's security, please bring a collar and leash for your dog or a pet carrier for your cat. You might also want to bring along something to read if you choose to remain at the clinic while your pet is in surgery. If you bring a mobile device you will be welcome to use our wireless service to access the internet.

6. Oral examination
Dr. Hale  will start with as thorough an oral examination as your pet will allow (some pets have very sore mouths and are understandably reluctant to let a stranger go poking around). With the information from the history and the initial examination he will develop a tentative diagnosis, explain his findings and start outlining the treatment options.

7. Treatment options
Dr. Hale will discuss his findings with you so that, together, you can determine the best treatment for your pet’s specific situation. He will write up a treatment plan and estimate, then ask for your consent. In most cases, he will then administer a pre-anesthetic sedative and ask you to return to the reception lounge to sit with your pet while sedation takes effect and he and his assistant get the equipment organized for surgery.

All owners are required to sign Dr. Hale's Estimate and Surgical Consent form. In some cases they may also be required to sign a waiver.

8. Anesthesia
About fifteen minutes after the injection of pre-med, your pet will be taken to the treatment room. An intravenous catheter will be placed and your pet will be given some fluids and oxygen prior to induction of general anesthesia. Once your pet is under anesthesia, Dr. Hale will do a more thorough oral examination and intra-oral dental radiographs. He will then meet with you in the examination room again to discuss the new findings and either confirm or refine the treatment plan and estimate to obtain informed consent to proceed.

9. Surgery
At this stage you will be given the option of staying in reception, or leaving the hospital for a time. If you leave, and do not have a cell phone with you, you will take the hospital's cell phone along so that Dr. Hale can contact you if the need arises. You will also be instructed on when you should return to the hospital.

10. Recovery
After surgery, one of the RVTs will stay with your pet during recovery from anesthesia while Dr. Hale writes up the record, discharge statement and invoice. If you are back in time, you may be encouraged to sit with and cuddle your pet during recovery.

As you can see, patient comfort is a high priority at Hale Veterinary Clinic. This is one of our patients during recovery enjoying a relaxing time on the love-seat in the reception area while awaiting his owner's return. Most animals recover on thick cushions on the floor of the treatment room until they are ready to stand and walk.

11. Discharge
By the time Dr. Hale has done all his paperwork and gone over your discharge instructions with you, your pet will likely be ready to go home. For dogs, that means they are able to stand and walk out on their own. For cats, it means they are sitting up and are bright and alert.

12. It’s your call
As you can see, Dr. Hale wants his clients to be quite involved in the decision-making process. He may have preferences, but ultimately, it will be your call.

13. Other options
The above description represents a typical visit, but Dr. Hale can be flexible. He will do his best to tailor your visit to meet your needs and expectations while tending to your pet’s needs. However, in all cases, lines of communication must be kept open at all times so any surprises can be discussed and the treatment plan adjusted as needed.

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Services ] Referrals ] [ A Visit ] Frequently Asked Questions ] Virtual Tour ] Staff ] Map to Office ] Dental Care for Pets ] Forms & Handouts ] News ] Continuing Ed. ] Old CUSP Articles ] Book ] Contacts ] Links ]
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